Freemasonry and the Irish Republican Army

Freemasonry and the Irish Republican Army

MASONIC HISTORY

To Obey the Moral Law

When There Is Lawlessness:

Freemasonry and the Irish Republican Army

On April 24, 1922, gunmen of the Irish Republican Army seized Freemasons’ Hall in Dublin, commencing a 38-day occupation of the headquarters of the Grand Lodge of Ireland.

And that was the good news.

After the First World War, a Nationalist movement gained momentum in Ireland, which had been domineered by England since the reign of King Henry II in the twelfth century. By the twentieth century, something had to give, and the Irish Nationalists succeeded in winning independence for almost the entire island, and the Republic of Ireland was born. As you know, the six counties of Northern Ireland remain part of the United Kingdom. That’s a whole other story, but please know the Grand Lodge of Ireland unifies our Craft across Ireland—both the Republic and Northern Ireland—to this day.

But during that civil war a century ago, Freemasonry was trapped between Nationalists and Unionists; Catholics and Protestants; neighbors and neighbors. Lodges were ransacked and burned, and Masons and their families had to flee their homes in fear of violence. The Masonic fraternity was considered part of the English-Protestant establishment despite the Grand Lodge being established 197 years earlier by lodges that naturally were older than that.

I’ll get straight to the record, drawing from both Masonic and outside sources.

During the Grand Lodge of Ireland’s December 27, 1922 St. John’s Day Stated Communication, Deputy Grand Master Claude Cane summarized what had transpired at Freemasons’ Hall, Dublin earlier that year:

“What happened here in the South of Ireland during the past year, and especially in this house of ours, is so fresh within your memory that I need not elaborate it very much. You all know and will remember how on the twenty-fourth of April, this beautiful Hall of ours was suddenly invaded by a number of armed and lawless men, and taken forcible possession of. The occurrence was not wholly unexpected, fortunately perhaps, because I had heard warnings of it for some weeks before. I took upon myself, some six weeks before the occurrence actually took place, to remove all the archives and things which really mattered as far as the history of the Grand Lodge of Ireland was concerned from the doubtful security of our strong room and safes downstairs to a much safer place, a place where they were in absolutely perfect safety all through the trouble, and where they still remain. Naturally the current books, and things you were using every day, had to remain in the Hall and take their chance. But I am alluding more particularly to the old minute books and old records and things of that sort, belonging to the Grand Lodge ever since the year there first was a Grand Lodge in Ireland, nearly two hundred years ago, which would have been absolutely irreplaceable. These were all absolutely safe the whole time.

“As you may imagine, after the occupation became an accomplished fact, my frame of mind was not a very enviable one. I had to assume a very great deal of responsibility, and I felt that any wrong step on my part, or on the part of those with whom I took counsel, might lead to very much worse things than had already happened. I felt that anything would be better than having this building and all its contents destroyed; I felt that sooner than rush things, it was better to submit to what was an undoubted indignity, and a great pain and grief to all of us for some time rather than run the risk of seeing all that we held most sacred go up in flames and ashes. So for six weeks I, and others who were advising me, had to possess our souls in patience. So many Brethren gave me such valuable help during that time—with advice and work as well—that it would really be invidious to name anyone in particular, with the exception, I think, of one Brother whose work was not at an end when we got this Hall back, but to whom we all owe a very deep debt of gratitude for all he has done in restoring us to our possessions here, and that is your Grand Superintendent of Works, Brother G. Murray Ross.

“I should like also to personally thank Brother Besson, of the Hibernian Hotel, for the very prompt way in which he came to our rescue and gave us the resources of his house and a room in which to establish a temporary office. It was a great advantage to us to only have to cross the street and to be saved from the trouble of looking out for someplace where the business of Grand Lodge could be carried on. Brother Besson was most accommodating and most kind to us all through that time. (Add arson story.)

“I am bound to say that during all the negotiations carried on with the view of getting this building restored to us, I was treated with the very greatest courtesy and consideration by those members of the Provisional Government with whom I came in contact. They seemed to realize fully what our Order is. I am speaking particularly now of two men who are no longer living, no longer in the government: Mr. Michael Collins and Mr. Arthur Griffiths. They seemed to realize that, so far from our being a dangerous body, we were a body, as we are, bound to support, and give all the assistance we can, to any legally constituted government of the country in which we live, and that we are entirely deserving of the support of that government. When I found that they were in this frame of mind, I must say that a great load was lifted from my mind; I felt that we in our future, once law and order were established in Ireland, would be assured, and I believe that it will be so. No government with any sense at all can fail to recognize that a body composed as we are, and holding the principles that we do, and taught, as we are taught, in our ceremonies and ancient charges, can be anything but a source of strength to any reasonable government.

“At the same time I wish to remind you again, as I did last year, that it is our bounden duty, not as an organization, because we are forbidden to act as a political organization, but as individual members it is our bounden duty as Masons to be good citizens and to support the Government under which we live, so long as that Government protects us. Both here in Southern Ireland, and in Northern Ireland, where there is a different Government, that applies.

“It is a very bright spot in our future outlook to find how thoroughly in accordance with us our Brethren in the North are. Whatever divisions otherwise may happen in Ireland, there is not the slightest prospect, at present at any rate, of any division between the Masons of Northern Ireland and the Masons of Southern Ireland. The Masons of Ulster, equally with the Masons of Dublin and the South have one great common heritage: the Grand Lodge of Ireland. The Grand Lodge of Ireland is the Grand Lodge of Ireland, not of any particular section of Ireland. As long as it remains the Grand Lodge of Ireland, it ranks as the second Grand Lodge in the world, and in point of everything except a few years of age, I think we can claim full equality with the mother Grand Lodge of the world, England.”

Grand Secretary Henry C. Shellerd expanded on the subject:

“In many parts of the country, the buildings used for Masonic purposes were wrecked by irresponsible individuals, who seemed to delight in the destruction of all sorts of property not adequately protected. The Grand Master, in the wise exercise of his discretion, prohibited the meetings of the lodges in all the Provinces of Southern Ireland for a considerable part of the year. During the past three months, however, a better spirit seems to have prevailed, and the exercise of the discretionary power granted to Provincial Grand Masters to permit lodges to meet, has so far been attended by no unpleasant incidents. That the Dublin Freemasons’ Hall has been handed back to the Order without any wanton injury to the edifice or its contents is an indication that there is no special hostility to our Order in the Metropolis.

“The fact that the annual returns from lodges in the South and West of Ireland are reaching headquarters daily proves that the lawlessness which was rampant some months ago is being steadily brought under control, and that our Brethren in every part of the country, North and South, are acutated by an intense desire to uphold the Great Principles of Peace and Goodwill with which our Order, throughout its whole history, and in every part of the world, has been so closely identified.”

Beyond Dublin, matters were not as amicable. The Spectator, in its June 3, 1922 edition, reports:

“Many Masonic halls have now been destroyed, one of the first to suffer being that at Ballinamore. In Mullingar, the Masonic Hall was raided, and all the windows were smashed. Petrol was poured over the broken furniture, and the complete destruction of the place was prevented only by the intervention of the local priest. In Dundalk, which is not very far from the Ulster frontier, there were three Masonic lodges with a fairly large membership. Their hall was raided and the books and other property seized. Many of the members received a few days’ notice to leave the town, and some of them had to escape hurriedly to Belfast. As a consequence of these proceedings, the meetings of these lodges have been indefinitely suspended. … No man residing in the ‘Irish Free State’ whose name appears on the roll of the Grand Lodge of Freemasons of Ireland can, at the present time, have any sense of security for himself or his family. He can only look to his brethren in Great Britain to use their influence with the British Government on his behalf. The preservation of life and property is not a matter of party politics; it is an elementary principal of any Government, and it is the absolute duty of the British Cabinet to see that it is maintained in Ireland.”

The Builder, one of the great Masonic periodicals of early twentieth century America, includes letters to the editor in its September 1922 issue that tell more. Right Worshipful Claude Cane, the Deputy Grand Master quoted earlier, writes in part in a letter dated May 30: “I do not believe there is any general hostility to the Order in Southern Ireland, nor do I believe that any feeling of the sort is encouraged by the Roman Catholic Church, which fully appreciates the difference between Irish Freemasonry and that carried on by the so-called Continental Grand Lodges, which reject our first and principal great Landmark, and consequently are not recognized by us.”

A Bro. George A. Anderson of Pennsylvania writes: “A large number of the Masons in America do not know how conditions are in Ireland, neither do they know the real cause of it all, and I think they should know.” He also included a letter from Bro. W.J. Allen in Belfast who says:

“The condition of things over here has not improved very much of late, except that there are not so many shootings in our own city. … The Masonic Halls are being raided, and in many cases destroyed. The Grand Lodge premises in Dublin are at present in the occupation of the I.R.A. There was a curious result of that the other day.

“We were starting a new preceptory in Belfast in connection with our lodge and had applied for a warrant. Before the warrant could be issued, the premises in Dublin has been seized, and all the forms were kept there. The Masonic authorities had to get a copy of the latest warrant issued, and from this they made a fresh copy all in the writing of the Grand officer. This warrant was used last Saturday and is in the possession of our Registrar. The Masonic authorities here, for some reason or other, do not want to appeal to Freemasons outside or to make ‘political capital’ of the seizure, but I think it would be well if the Freemasons of America were freely told of the campaign that is going on against the Order in Ireland. Perhaps you could help a little in this in a quiet way among your own associates. There was one man, whom I know personally, who had a narrow escape in the recent murders in County Cork. He is a Methodist clergyman, and was in one of the houses that were visited. He escaped from bed in his nightshirt and got away into the fields. It was the middle of April and the weather was very cold at the time. Three or four others were shot dead the same night. His brother is a member of my lodge, is Registrar of my chapter, and first Preceptor of the new preceptory. He is a past Provincial Senior Grand Warden of the Province of Antrim. That is the Masonic province of course, which is practically the same as the ordinary County of Antrim.”

A clipping from the May 18 edition of a Belfast newspaper also was provided to The Builder. It reads, in part: “Recently one of the South of Ireland gun clubs issued a statement boasting that they were going to compel all Freemasons and Unionists in the ‘Free State’ to supply food, clothing, and housing accommodation to Roman Catholic unemployed. Their fellow ruffians had for a long time been burning down Masonic and Orange Halls and persecuting Freemasons along with other Protestants.

“The continuance of these outrages, which there is no evidence to show the Free State forces now responsible for law and order ever tried to stop, has caused the Earl of Donoughmore, Most Worshipful Grand Master of Irish Freemasonry, to issue an order suspending all meetings of Masonic lodges in Southern Ireland.”

To conclude, I draw from the January 1923 issue of The New Age Magazine, published by the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Southern Jurisdiction. It quotes from the October 7, 1922 edition of The Northern Whig and Belfast Post story “Masonry in Ireland,” which covered the previous day’s annual concert in Ulster Hall benefiting Masonic charities. The Provincial Grand Master’s remarks were relayed:

“He thanks those present for their attendance there that evening, not so much for the pecuniary support for the object for which the concert was being held—that was their Masonic charities—but for the moral support they gave to the Order by their presence there. In those days he must say that Freemasonry needed all the support it could get not only from those inside the Order, but from its many friends outside the Order.

“Freemasonry in Ireland has been coming through very difficult times. Their halls had been raided and burned, and their brethren in many cases had been ill-used in other parts of Ireland. Scandalous and scurrilous charges had been brought against their Order. He did not say their Order was perfect. It was, after all, only a human institution, and no human institution was perfect—not even their churches and their ministers, who perhaps ought to set the highest standard—so Freemasonry could not claim perfection, but it was strange that the charges that were brought against them were chiefly under two heads, on which they were absolutely guiltless.

“First of all, the charge was made that Freemasonry was a political society, but if there was one thing above all other that was never mentioned inside the walls of the Masonic lodge, and that was absolutely barred by the laws of their Order, it was anything in the nature of politics. They were also blamed for being an irreligious society. They were perhaps irreligious in a sense because the word religion was unfortunately too often mixed up—and oftener in Ireland perhaps than anywhere else—with sectarianism. Freemasonry was absolutely nonsectarian, and it was a calumny to say that any Order whose fundamental tenets were the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man was an irreligious Order.”

It is Anderson’s Constitutions of 1723 whence modern Freemasons receive our charges to be good, and religiously circumspect, citizens where we make our lives. “A Mason is a peaceable Subject to the Civil Powers, wherever he resides or works,” it reads, “and is never to be concern’d in Plots and Conspiracies against the Peace and Welfare of the Nation, nor to behave himself undutifully to inferior Magistrates.…”

The First Charge, the famous one, titled “Concerning God and Religion,” states:

“A Mason is oblig’d by his Tenure to obey the moral law, and if he rightfully understands the Art, he will never be a stupid Atheist nor an irreligious Libertine. But though in ancient Times Masons were charg’d in every Country to be of the Religion of that Country or Nation, whatever it was, yet ’tis now thought more expedient only to oblige them to that Religion in which all Men agree, leaving their particular Opinions to themselves; that is, to be good Men and true, or Men of Honour and Honesty, by whatever Denominations or Persuasions they may be distinguish’d, whereby Masonry becomes the Center of Union, and the Means of conciliating true Friendship among Persons that must have remain’d at a perpetual Distance.”

In a free and peaceful society, this is done effortlessly, but when domestic tranquility is imperiled I imagine one requires disciplined application of all Four Cardinal Virtues—with innate reliance on the Theosophical Virtues as well—to remain steadfast.

(In medieval England, the various Statutes of Laborers regulated masons’ qualifications, remuneration, ability to meet, and other details, but the statute of 1405 specifically compelled such workers to take an annual oath to comply with the law.)

Perhaps the condition of Freemasonry today is not ideal in instances. Could be the content of lodge meetings isn’t exactly how we prefer it; or maybe the size of the membership remains a worry; or some may think their grand master is a bum—but things have been, and can be, far worse.

Written by: W. Bro. Jay Hochberg

WB Hochberg is the Senior Warden of The American Lodge of Research in Manhattan; is a Past Master of New Jersey Lodge of Masonic Research and Education 1786; and also is at labor in Civil War Lodge of Research 1865 in Virginia.

Masonic Ritual – Gavel Raps

Masonic Ritual – Gavel Raps

MASONIC RITUAL

The Ritual – Gavel Raps

 

MASONIC RITUAL EXPLAINED BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE CUSTODIANS OF THE WORK

Knocking Three Times

What is the symbolic significance of the three (or two or one) gavel raps given by the principal officers during the Rituals of Opening and Closing?

In the Grand Lodge of New York,

There are many elements of our Rituals of Opening and Closing that arose during a time when the practice in New York was to open directly into whichever Degree was the most convenient for the contemplated the work of the evening. This was usually the First Degree unless the Fellowcraft or Master Mason Degrees were being conferred that evening, in which case the Lodge might open on the Second or Third Degree. The documentary record also shows that Lodges in the various Degrees worked as discrete entities with no “changeover” or other way of moving between Degrees. Thus, for example, if a Lodge wanted to examine an Entered Apprentice and then confer the Fellowcraft Degree upon him in the same evening, they would open as an Entered Apprentice Lodge, do the examination, close the Entered Apprentice Lodge, open as a Fellowcraft Lodge, confer the Degree and close the Fellowcraft Lodge. We have a similar ability today through the ceremony for Closing to a Lodge of Another Degree.

So, while it may seem to modern-day New York Masons that we have been opening on the Third Degree for centuries, nothing could be further from the truth. The system employed in the Grand Lodge of New York until 2019 that required opening and closing on the Third Degree was an innovation that arose during the 1840s. The reasons behind that change are too complex and political for this format, but Brothers who are curious to know more can invite me to give my talk on that subject in their Lodges.

So, to return to the question… The principal officers give one, two, or three knocks as part of the Ritual to Opening as part of a system designed to ensure that all those in attendance are clear as to the Degree to which the Lodge will open and work. This is also why the Tiler is informed twice and why the three principal officers each inform the Brethren, among other practices designed to make sure everyone is on the same page as to the Degree.

The answers provided here reflect GLNY customs, rules, and ritual. We welcome discussion about how these may differ in your jurisdiction.

Response provided by RW Samuel Lloyd Kinsey
Chairman, Custodians of the Work, Grand Lodge of New York

Note: This site is an excellent source of information about Freemasonry. While every effort has been made to provide accurate and up-to-date information about Masonic Ritual, please remember that a website is not a substitute for your jurisdiction’s Standard Work or Approved Ritual.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey
Masonic Ritual – Knocking Three Times Symbolic Significance

Masonic Ritual – Knocking Three Times Symbolic Significance

MASONIC RITUAL

The Ritual – Symbolic Significance

 

MASONIC RITUAL EXPLAINED BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE CUSTODIANS OF THE WORK

Knocking Three Times

What is the symbolic significance of knocking three times?

In the Grand Lodge of New York,

Other than the meanings ascribed in the Lecture of Reasons and the Fellowcraft and Master Mason Lectures of Forms and Ceremonies in the Standard Work and Lectures of the Grand Lodge of New York, there is no particular significance ascribed in our working, although other Ritual workings may impute some symbolic association. Some extended Degree systems explain a symbolism in connection with the number of knocks and/or manner of knocking, but it is always important to bear in mind that these rites expand on what is already set forth in the three Craft Degrees and, while any explanations they provide have significance within the Degree systems from which they arise, meanings ascribed in extended Degree systems have no bearing on the content and meaning of Craft Rituals and customs within the context of a Symbolic Lodge.

The answers provided here reflect GLNY customs, rules, and ritual. We welcome discussion about how these may differ in your jurisdiction.

Response provided by RW Samuel Lloyd Kinsey
Chairman, Custodians of the Work, Grand Lodge of New York

Note: This site is an excellent source of information about Freemasonry. While every effort has been made to provide accurate and up-to-date information about Masonic Ritual, please remember that a website is not a substitute for your jurisdiction’s Standard Work or Approved Ritual.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey
Masonic Ritual – Seeking Admittance

Masonic Ritual – Seeking Admittance

MASONIC RITUAL

The Ritual – Seeking Admittance

 

MASONIC RITUAL EXPLAINED BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE CUSTODIANS OF THE WORK

Knocking Three Times

Why do we knock three times on the inner or outer door when seeking admittance?

In the Grand Lodge of New York,

This is a practice that goes back to some of the earliest documentary records of Masonic Ritual and custom. The first mention that comes to mind is a 1723 exposure entitled A Mason’s Examination. More significantly, it appears in the famous 1730 exposure Masonry Dissected, which, although it was an exposure, was so popular that virtually all the practices it describes—whether accurate at the time or not—became enshrined in Masonic custom and practice. Knocking three times was further reinforced with the publication of an equally influential pair of exposures in the 1760s, one of which was entitled Three Distinct Knocks.

The number three has had significance to Masons for a long time, of course. There are three principal officers, three great and three lesser lights, three moveable and three immovable jewels, three ruffians caught by three craftsmen, three principal tenets, and so on. And, given the time period and milieu in which these customs arose, we shouldn’t discount the influence of the Holy Trinity. The early catechisms also frequently explain that various things (coughs, taps, movements, etc.) can be done in threes to covertly signal one’s membership to others in the know.

So, if we put together the Craft’s fondness for the number three with the widespread dissemination and emulation of Masonic practices set forth in influential exposures and the fact that knocking three times is common in most any circumstance, our practice is not too surprising.

The answers provided here reflect GLNY customs, rules, and ritual. We welcome discussion about how these may differ in your jurisdiction.

Response provided by RW Samuel Lloyd Kinsey
Chairman, Custodians of the Work, Grand Lodge of New York

Note: This site is an excellent source of information about Freemasonry. While every effort has been made to provide accurate and up-to-date information about Masonic Ritual, please remember that a website is not a substitute for your jurisdiction’s Standard Work or Approved Ritual.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey
Beyond Ritual – Traveling with the Masters Word

Beyond Ritual – Traveling with the Masters Word

MASONIC RITUAL

Beyond Ritual

Traveling with the Masters Word

Brethren of the Craft, today we embark on a profound journey, delving into the intricate symbolism that lies at the heart of Freemasonry. As we navigate through the enigmatic depths of our cherished fraternity, we shall unveil the profound significance concealed within the question: “What induced you to become a Master Mason?” This query’s response holds layers of symbolic meaning that lead us through the sacred passages of our time-honored traditions.

In the rich tapestry of Freemasonry, we are reminded that our voyage is not limited to the  physical realm. Rather, it constitutes a symbolic odyssey, guiding us towards self-improvement, enlightenment, and dedicated service to humanity. The words, “To obtain the Master’s word, travel in foreign countries, work and receive Master’s wages…” encapsulate profound and multi-faceted truths.  

In the context of Freemasonry, the response to the question elicits several profound symbolic explanations. The aspiration of ancient Brethren to become Masters was driven by the quest for the Master’s word, which acts as a metaphorical key to unlock the ability to “travel in foreign countries.” This answer resonates on different levels. First, gaining the Master’s word signifies a pivotal achievement, akin to a passport that grants access to explore the intricate and diverse realms within Freemasonry. Just as a traveler explores foreign lands with different customs and cultures, Masons delve into the domains of philosophy, history, and symbolism within the Craft.

Importantly, at the core of this response resides the concept of “the Word.” Our Masonic  heritage regales us with tales of a Word of profound significance, known only to a select few but eventually lost to the annals of time. This Word, my brethren, is far from a mere sequence of letters; it embodies divine truth and knowledge, once imparted to the patriarchs of humanity. As Freemasons, our calling entails the pursuit of this elusive truth, to uncover the profound wisdom concealed beneath the surface.  

Symbolically, this Word stands as a beacon of Divine Truth, guiding our Masonic voyage. In  much the same way that a traveler immerses themselves in the intricacies of foreign lands, we  Masons immerse ourselves in the domains of philosophy, history and symbolism as alluded to  earlier. Our journey takes diverse forms – from the Entered Apprentice to the Fellowcraft and  culminating in the Master Mason – each degree marking a step towards enlightenment. Our  pursuit extends beyond mere knowledge acquisition, transforming into a quest for self-discovery and the embodiment of virtue. 

Symbolically “traveling in foreign countries” encapsulates a journey through distinct territories of  knowledge within Freemasonry. These realms are enriched with philosophical insights, historical perspectives, and profound symbolism – each presenting a unique facet of the Masonic experience. With the Master’s word as our guide, we gain entry into these symbolic lands of enlightenment. 

Within this journey, we encounter challenges akin to those encountered by travelers in foreign  lands. Just as a sojourner faces hurdles, we, too, encounter trials. The portrayal of old age and death in the Master Mason degree serves as a reminder that our earthly existence is  ephemeral, and the pursuit of absolute truth may elude us. However, solace can be found in the substitute for the lost Word, a guiding light to wisdom, urging us to await the time when perfect understanding shall be attained.  
Our Masonic voyage, however, extends beyond the confines of our earthly journey. The symbolism alludes to a life beyond the grave, where the recovery of the Word symbolizes a  state post-mortality. This suggests that true enlightenment finds its ultimate fulfillment beyond  the limitations of our earthly existence. Our labor, our unwavering search for the Word,  transforms into a form of worship, a dedication to the pursuit of divine truth. The concept of “to work and receive Master’s wages” transcends mere monetary exchanges; it embodies the acquisition of knowledge and wisdom within the context of Freemasonry. 

These teachings empower us not only for personal betterment but also to excel as husbands,  fathers, sons, brothers and active community members. Armed with the wisdom of our Craft, we become agents of upliftment for ourselves and those around us. While the latter part of the Masonic ritual underscores the importance of supporting ourselves, our families and the Masonic community more broadly – particularly those in need – this assistance encompasses more than mere financial aid. It underscores our duty to apply Masonic teachings, becoming steadfast pillars in our communities, extending compassion and care to fellow Masons, their widows, orphans, and those facing adversity. 

In essence, the Masonic journey mirrors the symbolic framework we’ve explored. The  acquisition of the Master’s Word empowers us to “travel in foreign countries,” embarking on  meaningful explorations into diverse domains of knowledge, achieving enlightenment and  strengthening ourselves and our communities. As Master Masons, we heed this symbolic call –  to enrich ourselves with the Master’s Word and to embark on these profound transformative journeys.  

It is worth noting that our ancient operative Brethren aspired to become Masters to practice their craft while traveling in literal “foreign countries.” In a speculative sense, Freemasons desire to “travel in foreign countries” to study and explore their craft. However, these “foreign countries”  hold a distinct meaning for us – they symbolize the various aspects of Masonic knowledge, philosophy, history, and symbolism awaiting discovery within the fraternity. 

In conclusion, Brethren, our journey within Freemasonry is a profound and intricate one. The  symbolism inherent in the Word instructs us to seek divine truth, to traverse the uncharted  realms of knowledge, and to labor diligently for personal enlightenment and the upliftment of our  families and communities. The pursuit of light becomes our mission, and through the pursuit of  knowledge, we unearth the profound depths of Freemasonry’s allegorical nature.

Let this wisdom serve as a guiding Light on your Masonic voyage. Let us remember that our true reward is not solely found in words or rituals, but rather in our personal growth,  enlightenment, the impactful contributions we make as Freemasons, and the indissoluble bonds of Brotherhood that are formed as a derivation of our travels. In our unwavering quest for divine truth, let us continue to plumb the limitless depths of our Craft, tirelessly striving to enhance ourselves and our world.

Written by:

John Pasqualicchio, Master Adonai Lodge #718, Highland, New York

Jason Short